24/7, Insurances Accepted (866) 480-4328
24/7, Insurances Accepted 866-480-4328

Xanax Addiction Treatment

When taken as prescribed, Xanax has potent and therapeutic anti-anxiety, anti-convulsant, and sedative effects. Like many benzodiazepines, frequent or long-term use of Xanax can result in dependence and withdrawal symptoms. Combining Xanax with another depressant, such as alcohol or an opiate painkiller, can be extremely dangerous.

Xanax addiction, dependence, and withdrawal syndrome are serious and uncomfortable physical and mental health problems that might require professional help. Without medically overseen Xanax addiction treatment, people are likely to suffer symptoms like intense anxiety, insomnia, seizures, and depression.

Call to get help now

The Effects of Xanax on the Body

Xanax is a powerful benzodiazepine drug that was first introduced in 1976. Xanax comes in tablet and liquid form and its generic name is alprazolam. Like many depressants, it is highly addictive.

Xanax is often prescribed for mental health disorders related to anxiety, including generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, and various phobias or fears.

Xanax is the most frequently prescribed benzodiazepine in the U.S., with approximately 50 million prescriptions written each year. This far exceeds the prescription counts of other benzodiazepines, such as Ativan, Klonopin, Valium, and Restoril.

All benzodiazepines share similar properties, but the biggest difference among them is the speed and duration of their effects. Xanax acts quickly, with most of the desired effects occurring within the first hour of use. Total effects of Xanax typically last for at least six hours. Like many prescription tranquilizers, Xanax can inspire euphoria in the user, which is why it can be so easily abused.

Side Effects of Xanax

Xanax reduces activity in the central nervous system and slows brain function. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), some signs of Xanax use even during safe use include:

  • Slurred speech
  • Shallow breathing
  • Sluggishness and fatigue
  • Disorientation and lightheadedness
  • Lack of coordination
  • Dilated pupils
  • Impaired memory, judgment, and coordination
  • Paranoia
  • Constipation
  • Irritability
  • Suicidal thoughts

People who chronically use or abuse Xanax often suffer problems with lack of alertness, poor judgment, poor coordination, and drowsiness. This is why physicians generally only prescribe Xanax for shorter treatment periods.

Building a Xanax Tolerance

As with most central nervous system depressants, Xanax requires taking larger and larger dosages to get the same high.

As a tolerance for Xanax grows, so does the user’s brain’s reliance on it. At first, a person needs Xanax to get high. Next, the patient needs it to feel relaxed. Finally, the patients must take it just to “feel normal.”

The average person with a Xanax addiction will take between 20 and 30 pills per day, according to healthresearchfunding.org.

Because Xanax is so addictive, kicking the habit can be difficult without professional Xanax addiction treatment. Cravings and physically uncomfortable symptoms grow stronger and will only abate with another dose of Xanax.

When this occurs, people typically need professional Xanax addiction treatment. Withdrawing from a Xanax addiction should never be attempted alone because the effects of withdrawal can be severe and long-lasting.

Call to get help now

Xanax Addiction Symptoms

Alcohol, Xanax, Valium, and marijuana are all depressants, and they are the most frequently abused substances in the world. According to statistics by healthresearchfunding.org, the number of annual hospital admissions directly related to Xanax use is approximately 60,000.

When combined with alcohol, which is another central nervous system depressant, the consequences can be dangerous and even deadly. Poor reflexes, poor balance, decreased blood pressure, fainting, coma, and even death are all likely outcomes of chronically abusing Xanax with other drugs like alcohol and opiates.

If you’re concerned that you have developed an addiction to Xanax but you’re not sure if you need help, ask yourself:

  • Do I get more than one prescription from more than one doctor, buy it on the street or take it from a friend?
  • Have I ever lied to others about how much Xanax I’ve taken?
  • Do I feel anxious and irritable when I can’t take my drugs on time?
  • Do I keep using Xanax even though I can’t really afford it?
  • Do I keep going back to using, even though I try to stop?
  • Am I afraid of withdrawal?
  • Do I have increasing problems with my relationships, at work or with the law?
  • Do I spend more time alone or with a new crowd who love drugs as much as I do?
  • Do I suffer from memory problems of feel confused a lot?
  • Do I know that it’s time to quit using?

If you have answered yes to any of these questions, the time to get Xanax addiction treatment is now.

Xanax Addiction Treatment

Because of how Xanax and Xanax addiction affects the brain, quitting suddenly without professional Xanax addiction treatment is a bad idea.

It is important that Xanax addiction treatment is handled properly. Helping loved ones with Xanax addiction choose a detox center is a big step.

Detox centers apply different Xanax abuse treatment methods, but they all have a general pattern. Treatment tends to begin with physiological, social, and psychological assessments. Detox centers sometimes use an IV-based medication to treat withdrawal symptoms. A good treatment plan should involve round-the-clock monitoring and attention to the patient’s personal comfort as the drugs leave the body.

In general, it is advisable to seek inpatient treatment after detox. A medically supervised addiction treatment facility is equipped with professional staff. This staff is knowledgeable about benzodiazepine detoxification.

Withdrawal symptoms for Xanax include both mental and physical symptoms that can be very serious. In the controlled environment of a treatment center, they are more easily managed. At these inpatient treatment centers, you will also be taught how to overcome Xanax cravings and triggers to avoid relapse.

Our staff is available 24/7 to answer any questions you may have regardinthe xanax addiction treatment process. 866-480-4328

If you have a loved one who is addicted to Xanax but cannot attend inpatient treatment, intensive outpatient rehabilitation is recommended. Intensive outpatient treatment is available for those who have strict work, family, or community responsibilities that cannot be put on hold.

An outpatient program involves working with the patient at home several days a week. Group, family, or individual therapy sessions are all available options, as is some combination of all three.

Detox, counseling, and aftercare are common among almost all Xanax treatment programs. This is because addicts tend to suffer from both physical and psychological issues.

Many Xanax addiction treatment centers provide aftercare programs to their patients to help them ease back into their normal lives. Aftercare programs generally include counseling and support groups, as well as continued encouragement to those well into recovery.

In aftercare, there should be a way of monitoring patients to ensure they are sticking with the program. Sometimes, Xanax testing is used for this purpose.

Recover from Addiction Safely and Thoroughly

At 12 Keys, we help patients manage uncomfortable Xanax withdrawal symptoms and teach them how to beat cravings. At the same time, patients will learn why and how their drug abuse became a problem and develop the tools needed to rebuild a satisfying, drug-free lifestyle.

You don’t have to let Xanax define your choices. Call us now for a complimentary consultation and find out how 12 Keys Rehab can help you find your path to freedom, starting today. 866-480-4328

Stay in Touch

12 Keys Rehab

12 Keys Rehab